Hierarchy of Controls

Forces, people and injuries — How hard is too hard?

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ISO/TS 15066 body model
This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Hier­archy of Con­trols

For any­one involved in risk assess­ment and con­trol, there are always ques­tions regard­ing the amount of force it takes to injure a per­son. As soon as we decided that hurt­ing people when they were work­ing or using our products was not OK, clev­er people wanted to know what the lim­its were on forces applied to people. […]

Canada

Instructions for Use – the New ISO 20607

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Instruc­tions are one of the basic items that users expect to get when they pur­chase a product, and yet these import­ant doc­u­ments are often poorly writ­ten, badly trans­lated, and incom­plete. Key product fea­tures are badly described, and inform­a­tion on fea­tures, set­tings and haz­ards may be absent. All of this des­pite the fact that the min­im­um require­ments […]

Canada

More E-Stop Questions

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This entry is part 17 of 16 in the series Emer­gency Stop

Here are some more ques­tions I’ve been asked regard­ing emer­gency stop require­ments. These ones came to me through the IEEE PSES EMC-PSTC Product Com­pli­ance For­um mail­ing list. Primary Sources There are three primary sources for the require­ments for emer­gency stop devices: [1] Safety of machinery — Emer­gency stop — Prin­ciples for design, 3rd Edi­tion. ISO 13850. 2015. [2] Safety of […]