Machinery Safety 101

More E‑Stop Questions

This entry is part 17 of 16 in the series Emer­gency Stop

Here are some more ques­tions I’ve been asked regard­ing emer­gency stop require­ments. These ones came to me through the IEEE PSES EMC-PSTC Product Com­pli­ance For­um mail­ing list. Primary Sources There are three primary sources for the require­ments for emer­gency stop devices: [1] Safety of machinery — Emer­gency stop — Prin­ciples for design, 3rd Edi­tion. ISO 13850. 2015. [2] Safety of…

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Can Emergency Stop be used as an “on/off” control?

Emergency Stop Button
This entry is part 16 of 16 in the series Emer­gency Stop

Every couple of months I get an email ask­ing me if there is any reas­on why e‑stop func­tions can­’t be used as the primary power con­trol (on/off but­ton) for machinery. Fol­low­ing a recent exchange, I thought I would share the reas­ons for why this is such a bad idea. The short answer The short answer is an unequi­voc­al NO. Don’t…

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Introduction to Functional Safety Seminars

Man training a group of people, pointing to Functional Safety topics on the whiteboard

If you are inter­ested in func­tion­al safety, and I know many read­ers are based on the stat­ist­ics I see for my oth­er func­tion­al safety-related posts, I think you will be inter­ested in this. I am col­lab­or­at­ing with the IEEE Product Safety Engin­eer­ing Soci­ety’s Vir­tu­al Chapter to provide a series of three 35 minute sem­inars dis­cuss­ing the fun­da­ment­als of func­tion­al safety. The…

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Emergency Stop Pull-Cords

This entry is part 15 of 16 in the series Emer­gency Stop

This art­icle was updated 2019-04-26, adding spe­cif­ic details related to IEC 60947 – 5‑5. When it comes to emer­gency stop devices there is no doubt that the red mush­­room-head push but­ton is the most com­mon – they seem to be every­where. The second most com­mon emer­gency stop device is the pull-cord, and like the light-cur­­tain in safe­guard­ing…

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Emergency Stop Failures

This entry is part 13 of 16 in the series Emer­gency Stop

I am always look­ing for inter­est­ing examples of machinery safety prob­lems to share on MS101. Recently I was scrolling Reddit/r/OSHA and found these three real-world examples. Broken Emer­gency Stop But­tons The first and most obvi­ous kinds of fail­ures are those res­ult­ing from either wear out or dam­age to emer­gency stop devices like e‑stop but­tons or pull…

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Safe Drive Control including Safe Torque Off (STO)

Graph illustrating STO Function
This entry is part 12 of 16 in the series Emer­gency Stop

Ed. Note: This art­icle was revised 25-Jul-17 to include inform­a­tion on safe stand­still. Safe Drive Con­trol includ­ing STO Motor drives are every­where. From DC vari­able speed drives and index­ing drives, through AC Vari­able Fre­quency drives, servo drives and step­per motor drives, the cap­ab­il­it­ies and the flex­ib­il­ity of these elec­tron­ic sys­tems has giv­en machine design­ers unpre­ced­en­ted…

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How to do a 13849 – 1 analysis: Complete Reference List

This entry is part 8 of 9 in the series How to do a 13849 – 1 ana­lys­is

Post updated 2019-07-24. Ed. As prom­ised in pre­vi­ous posts, here is the com­plete ref­er­ence list for the series “How to do a 13849 – 1 ana­lys­is”! If you have any addi­tion­al resources you think read­ers would find help­ful, please add them in the com­ments. Copy­right secured by Digi­prove © 2017 – 2018Acknow­ledge­ments: As cited.Some Rights ReservedOri­gin­al con­tent here is pub­lished under these license terms: X License Type:Non-com­mer­cial, Attri­bu­tion,…

ISO 13849 – 1 Analysis — Part 8: Fault Exclusion

This entry is part 9 of 9 in the series How to do a 13849 – 1 ana­lys­is

Post updated 2019-07-24. Ed. Fault Con­sid­er­a­tion & Fault Exclu­sion ISO 13849 – 1, Chapter 7 [1, 7] dis­cusses the need for fault con­sid­er­a­tion and fault exclu­sion. Fault con­sid­er­a­tion is the pro­cess of examin­ing the com­pon­ents and sub-sys­tems used in the safety-related part of the con­trol sys­tem (SRP/CS) and mak­ing a list of all the faults that could occur in each…

ISO 13849 – 1 Analysis — Part 3: Architectural Category Selection

This entry is part 3 of 9 in the series How to do a 13849 – 1 ana­lys­is

Post updated 2019-07-24. Ed. At this point, you have com­pleted the risk assess­ment, assigned required Per­form­ance Levels to each safety func­tion, and developed the Safety Require­ment Spe­cific­a­tion for each safety func­tion. Next, you need to con­sider three aspects of the sys­tem design: Archi­tec­tur­al Cat­egory, Chan­nel Mean Time to Dan­ger­ous Fail­ure (MTTFD), and Dia­gnost­ic Cov­er­age (DCavg). In…

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ISO 13849 – 1 Analysis — Part 2: Safety Requirement Specification

This entry is part 2 of 9 in the series How to do a 13849 – 1 ana­lys­is

This art­icle was updated 2019-07-24. Ed. Devel­op­ing the Safety Require­ment Spe­cific­a­tion The Safety Require­ment Spe­cific­a­tion sounds pretty heavy, but actu­ally, it is just a big name for a way to organ­ize the inform­a­tion you need to have to ana­lyze and design the safety sys­tems for your machinery. Note that I am assum­ing that you are doing this in…

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