Machinery Safety 101

Force and injury — How hard is too hard? ISO 21260 will help

ISO/TS 15066 body model
This entry is part 5 of 5 in the series Hier­archy of Con­trols

Force rep­res­ents the mech­an­ic­al energy that causes injury to the human body. ISO/TC 199 has been work­ing on answer­ing that ques­tion since 2012.

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Instructions for Use – the New ISO 20607

Instruc­tions are one of the basic items that users expect to get when they pur­chase a product, and yet these import­ant doc­u­ments are often poorly writ­ten, badly trans­lated, and incom­plete. Key product fea­tures are badly described, and inform­a­tion on fea­tures, set­tings and haz­ards may be absent. All of this des­pite the fact that the min­im­um require­ments…

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More E‑Stop Questions

This entry is part 17 of 16 in the series Emer­gency Stop

Here are some more ques­tions I’ve been asked regard­ing emer­gency stop require­ments. These ones came to me through the IEEE PSES EMC-PSTC Product Com­pli­ance For­um mail­ing list. Primary Sources There are three primary sources for the require­ments for emer­gency stop devices: [1] Safety of machinery — Emer­gency stop — Prin­ciples for design, 3rd Edi­tion. ISO 13850. 2015. [2] Safety of…

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Introduction to Functional Safety Seminars

Man training a group of people, pointing to Functional Safety topics on the whiteboard

If you are inter­ested in func­tion­al safety, and I know many read­ers are based on the stat­ist­ics I see for my oth­er func­tion­al safety-related posts, I think you will be inter­ested in this. I am col­lab­or­at­ing with the IEEE Product Safety Engin­eer­ing Soci­ety’s Vir­tu­al Chapter to provide a series of three 35 minute sem­inars dis­cuss­ing the fun­da­ment­als of func­tion­al safety. The…

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5 Things You Need to Know About ANSI

Have you ever wondered about ANSI? Needed to know how ANSI stand­ards are developed? Find your answers and more in this post!

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Five reasons you should attend our Free Safety Talks

Banner for the Free Safety Talks

Reas­on #1 – Free Safety Talks You can­’t argue with Free Stuff! Last week we partnered with Schmersal Canada and Frank­lin Empire to put on three days of Free Safety Talks. We had full houses in all three loc­a­tions, Wind­sor, Lon­don and Cam­bridge, with nearly 60 people par­ti­cip­at­ing. We had two great presenters who helped…

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Machinery Safety Labels: 3 Top Tools for Effective Warnings

Safety label by Clarion Safety Systems
This entry is part 1 of 3 in the series Safety Labels

Machinery Safety Labels The third level of the Hier­archy of Con­trols is Inform­a­tion for Use. Safety Labels are a key part of the Inform­a­tion for Use provided by machine build­ers to users and are often the only inform­a­tion that many users get to see. This makes the design and place­ment of the safety labels crit­ic­al to…

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ISO 13849 – 1 Analysis — Part 8: Fault Exclusion

This entry is part 9 of 9 in the series How to do a 13849 – 1 ana­lys­is

Post updated 2019-07-24. Ed. Fault Con­sid­er­a­tion & Fault Exclu­sion ISO 13849 – 1, Chapter 7 [1, 7] dis­cusses the need for fault con­sid­er­a­tion and fault exclu­sion. Fault con­sid­er­a­tion is the pro­cess of examin­ing the com­pon­ents and sub-sys­tems used in the safety-related part of the con­trol sys­tem (SRP/CS) and mak­ing a list of all the faults that could occur in each…

ISO 13849 – 1 Analysis — Part 7: Safety-Related Software

General architecture model of software
This entry is part 7 of 9 in the series How to do a 13849 – 1 ana­lys­is

Post updated 2019-07-24. Ed. Safety-Related Soft­ware Up to this point, I have been dis­cuss­ing the basic pro­cesses used for the design of safety-related parts of con­trol sys­tems. The under­ly­ing assump­tion is that these tech­niques apply to the design of hard­ware used for safety pur­poses. The remain­ing ques­tion focuses on the design and devel­op­ment of safety-related soft­ware…

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New CSA Standard for Machinery Electrical Equipment

Elec­tric­al Equip­ment of Machinery Most mod­ern machinery is con­trolled elec­tric­ally, or elec­tron­ic­ally. There are a num­ber of stand­ards that apply to the design of con­trol sys­tems for machinery, with IEC 60204 – 1 and it’s EN equi­val­ent, along with IEC 61439 – 1 and IEC 61439 – 2 as the pre­dom­in­ant stand­ards inter­na­tion­ally, and NFPA 79 as the pre­dom­in­ant stand­ard in the…

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