Machinery Safety 101

Trapped Key Interlocking

This is a trapped key interlock on the door of an electrical switchgear cabinet. To open the door the key must be inserted and turned to withdraw a bolt that holds the door closed. With the bolt withdrawn, the key is held in the lock. The upstream switching device is held open by another interlock using the same key; since the key can only be in one of the two locks, it prevents accidentally closing the upstream switch while the cabinet is open for maintenance. The interlock is attached to the door with one-way screws to discourage casual removal of the lock, which would defeat the system.

Many machine designers think of interlocks as exclusively electrical devices; a switch is attached to a movable mechanical guard, and the switch is connected to the control system. Trapped Key Interlocking is a way to interlock guards that is equally effective, and often more appropriate in severe environmental conditions. Copyright secured by Digiprove © 2018Acknowledgements: As cited.Some Rights ReservedOriginal content here…

Five reasons you should attend our Free Safety Talks

Banner for the Free Safety Talks

Reason #1 – Free Safety Talks You can’t argue with Free Stuff! Last week we partnered with Schmersal Canada and Franklin Empire to put on three days of Free Safety Talks. We had full houses in all three locations, Windsor, London and Cambridge, with nearly 60 people participating. We had two great presenters who helped…

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CSA Z432 Safeguarding of Machinery – 3rd Edition

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Get the Basics Right!

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